Linux Configuration Notes

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Config
======
vm.overcommit_memory=2
vm.overcommit_ratio=100
overcommit_kbytes
=================
When overcommit_memory is set to 2, the committed address space is not
permitted to exceed swap plus this amount of physical RAM. See below.
Note: overcommit_kbytes is the counterpart of overcommit_ratio. Only one
of them may be specified at a time. Setting one disables the other (which
then appears as 0 when read).
overcommit_memory
=================
http://serverfault.com/questions/362589/effects-of-configuring-vm-overcommit-memory
This value contains a flag that enables memory overcommitment.
When this flag is 0, the kernel attempts to estimate the amount
of free memory left when userspace requests more memory.
When this flag is 1, the kernel pretends there is always enough
memory until it actually runs out.
When this flag is 2, the kernel uses a "never overcommit"
policy that attempts to prevent any overcommit of memory.
Note that user_reserve_kbytes affects this policy.
This feature can be very useful because there are a lot of
programs that malloc() huge amounts of memory "just-in-case"
and don't use much of it.
The default value is 0.
See Documentation/vm/overcommit-accounting and
security/commoncap.c::cap_vm_enough_memory() for more information.
overcommit_ratio
================
When overcommit_memory is set to 2, the committed address
space is not permitted to exceed swap plus this percentage
of physical RAM. See above.